-The Munich Pact is a classic example of appeasement is the 1938 Munich Pact, negotiated between Neville Chamberlain and Adolf Hitler. He should try to appease Hitler so that he does not attack Europe any more. -The Munich Agreement, also known as the Munich Pact, was an international agreement concluded in 1938, which aimed to avoid a war between the European powers, by cancelling the Sudetenland of Nazi Germany under Adolf Hitler. Before leaving Munich, Chamberlain and Hitler signed a document in which they explained their common desire to settle disputes through consultations to ensure peace. Daladier and Chamberlain both returned home to welcome exhilarating and acclaimed people, relieved that the danger of war had passed, and Chamberlain told the British public that he had “achieved peace with honour. I believe that this is peace for our time. His words were immediately defied by his greatest critic, Winston Churchill, who declared: “They had a choice between war and dishonour. You chose the disenchred, and you`re going to go to war. Indeed, Chamberlain`s policy was discredited the following year, when Hitler annexed the rest of Czechoslovakia in March, and then triggered World War II with the invasion of Poland in September. The Munich Agreement became synonymous with the futility of appeasement of the expansionist totalitarian states, although it bought time for the Allies to increase their military will. After successfully capturing Austria in Germany in March 1938, Adolf Hitler looked forward to Czechoslovakia, where about three million people were of German descent in the Sudetenland. In April, he discussed with Wilhelm Keitel, head of the high command of the Bundeswehr, the political and military aspects of Case Green, the code name for the Sudetenland acquisition project. A surprising rush of “clear skies without any cause or justification” was rejected, as the result would have been “a hostile opinion of the world that could lead to a critical situation”.

Decisive action would therefore take place only after a period of political turmoil on the part of the Germans within Czechoslovakia, accompanied by diplomatic quarrels which, if they became more serious, would be either an apology for the war or grounds for a blitz after an “incident” of German creation. In addition, disruptive political activities had been under way in Czechoslovakia since October 1933, when Konrad Henlein founded the German Sudetenland Internal Front. When Hitler continued to make incendiary speeches calling for the reunification of the Germans in Czechoslovakia with their homeland, war seemed imminent. However, neither France nor Great Britain felt ready to defend Czechoslovakia and both tried to avoid a military confrontation with Germany at all costs. In France, the popular Front government had ended and on 8 April 1938 Edouard Daladier formed a new cabinet without socialist participation or communist support. Four days later, Le Temps, whose foreign policy was controlled by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, published an article by Joseph Barthelemy, a professor at the Paris Law School, in which he scrutinized the 1924 Franco-Czechoslovakian Treaty of Alliance and concluded that France was not obliged to go to war to save Czechoslovakia. Earlier, on March 22, the Times of London published an editorial by its publisher G.G.