The Edinburgh Agreement (full title: agreement between the Government of the United Kingdom and the Scottish Government on a referendum on Scottish independence) is the agreement between the Scottish Government and the Government of the United Kingdom, signed on 15 October 2012 at St Andrew`s House in Edinburgh, concerning the terms of the 2014 Scottish independence referendum. [1] Asked whether ministers are ruleing out a referendum for the entire term of the next Scottish Parliament, regardless of the outcome of the election, he said: “It`s not for a generation.” The British government has repeatedly ruled out the possibility of allowing a second referendum on independence. Boris Johnson has said he will not approve another vote and says the issue was clarified in the 2014 “single vote”. In the agreement, the two governments agreed that the referendum should be overseen by an impartial electoral commission. The Commission would comment on the text of the question, register activists, appoint prominent activists, regulate campaign spending and finances, provide subsidies to campaign organizations, establish guidelines for referendum participants, cover the referendum process, conduct the poll and reveal the result. [3] The SNP`s 2019 election platform indicated that the party intended to hold a second referendum in 2020; It won 48 of Scotland`s 59 seats. Nicola Sturgeon said there was a “renewed, refreshed and strengthened mandate” for a new vote. She formally asked for power to do so on 19 December 2019, Prime Minister Boris Johnson rejected the request, saying the 2014 referendum was a “once-in-a-generation opportunity”. [1] In an interview with bbc Andrew Marr before the 2014 referendum, Alex Salmond cited an example of a “political generation” as the period between the 1979 and 1997 Scottish referendums (18 years). The Prime Minister`s letter, rejecting Ms Sturgeon`s request, read: “You and your predecessor made a personal promise that the 2014 independence referendum was a `one vote in a generation`. The people of Scotland voted strongly on this promise to keep our UK cohesive.¬†Prior to the 2014 vote, Nicola Sturgeon himself repeatedly called the referendum a “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity” or “once in a generation,” as in an interview with the BBC Daily Politics, where she said: “The SNP has always said that, from our point of view, these kinds of referendums are a `one generation` event. And he said First Minister Nicola Sturgeon had previously promised that the 2014 referendum would be a “one-generation vote”.

Constitutional rights advocates argue that while there are no legal consequences for rejecting the agreement, the political implications would be far-reaching. Curtice believes that in this case, the SNP would have a hard time instituting a second referendum before the “generation” Salmond spoke of. He argued that Alex Salmond and Nicola Sturgeon had “called for a referendum that was one in a generation, once in their lives,” and that he had accepted most of their demands. Much debate surrounds the term “once in a generation” used by SNP politicians before the 2014 vote, with some arguing that this means that a second referendum should not take place just six years after the first. . . .